ACM SIGUCCS Fall Conference @ Edmonton, Alberta November 5 - 8, 2006
 
 
 
Abstracts...

The abstracts for the technical papers are provided below. See which ones will expand your boundaries...




Higher Ed 101: Teaching Techies Higher Ed Culture
        Leslie P. Hitch , Beth-Anne Dancause (Northeastern University)

Training and Documentation

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 14

More often than not, the previous work experience of college and university information technology staff has been in industry. Another staff demographic is that many are relatively recent graduates. What they have in common is a hierarchical, standards-driven and technical worldview – the antithesis of the peculiarities of higher education's organizational structure. This void, despite excellent skills and knowledge of information technology, frequently results in miscommunication, misunderstanding, and costly mistakes when working with the majority of the university whose worldview is autonomous, variable and non-hierarchical (not to mention, non-technical).

After a series of embarrassing mistakes, we launched a mandatory professional development course called Higher Ed 101 to give our IT staff the vocabulary and understanding of the complexities of higher education's organizational structure, particularly shared governance, academic freedom and tenure. The rational was twofold: 1) to reduce disruption to the community because of insensitivity to the academic calendar and processes; and 2) to ease internal tension, raise levels of job satisfaction and develop flexible approaches to common campus technology issues. This paper details the course, Higher Ed 101, for use in staff training and development. It concludes with why making an investment in teaching the technology staff about the culture of higher education is as sound an investment in their (and the IT department's) future as is learning about the latest technology.

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Opening The Lines Of Communications With Open Source Software
        Laurie Fox , Shawn Plummer (SUNY Geneseo)

Customer Support

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 7



SUNY Geneseo’s original commercial helpdesk software was purchased and implemented nearly ten years ago. The drawbacks of managing a large software installation (high annual maintenance costs, complex administration needs that could not be met with current staffing levels, and prohibitive expansion costs) led to our exploration of a new helpdesk solution for the campus.We selected to implement open source helpdesk software. This decision has more benefits than just financial ones. Our customers now have self-service capabilities allowing them to create, view, and respond to their own issues. Customers are automatically notified via email when a new ticket is entered on their behalf and when that issue has been resolved. We also expanded the software to other areas of our IT department for project management and internal problem tracking.The flexibility of the solution we implemented allows us to work towards changing many of our previously, paper based, poorly tracked processes to be far more transparent and easy to maintain and monitor.We’ll discuss the impact of an open helpdesk system from management, technical, and customer perspectives, talk about the trials, tribulations, and hurdles we had to overcome along the way, and give a live demonstration of our implementation.

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The {216:1 Ratio} Bridging the Growing Support Gap Through Proactive Deployment of Emerging Technologies
        Johnathon A. Mohr (Philadelphia University)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 7


Philadelphia University is dynamic institution in the North Eastern Corridor. There are +/-1300 resident student supported by a team of 6 live in Residential Consultants. These students are your typical ResCon, in that they handle work orders in their free time while attending classes/working. We have developed a fluid model that allows the ResCons to address work orders at their own pace and in their time and have brought the time to resolution to +/-12 days. This has been accomplished by a variety of techniques such as ensuring that student machines are receiving updates (pushed registry key), have anti-virus software that is centrally managed and the deployment of several pieces of anti-spyware. In the fall, using a combination of full time support and hired shadow support, we believe It will be possible to push response times down to +/-5 days. This will be accomplished by augmenting out staff with paid students, deploying a series of self help guides and ensuring proper training for the help desk and residential student support. Thus, with a ratio of 216:1 (Student to ResCon) will become (118:1) with an exceptional response time. This increases overall satisfaction with the department, improves network/computing reliability and is done at a very minimal cost to the department. Overall this model provides value to the University by freeing up resources, ensuring stable computing and empowers the Residential Consultants to take ownership of their work and not be micromanaged.

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"IU-EVAL" An Electronic Course Evaluation System
        Hossein Hakimzadeh , Lynn Williams (Indiana University)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 12

Course evaluations are used as an important instrument for assessing teaching effectiveness and maintaining the quality of our academic programs. At Indiana University, students are given the opportunity to evaluate their courses at the end of each semester. The results are collected and analyzed by the corresponding academic units. The university dedicates a significant amount of monetary and human resources to conduct effective and confidential end-of-semester evaluations.

In order to improve the speed, accuracy, anonymity and privacy of course evaluations, the authors have developed a web-based course evaluation system called IU-EVAL. To date, the system has been tested by approximately 19,500 students. In this paper we explore the motivations behind the development of IU-EVAL and discuss some of lessons learned during the deployment and administration of the system. We will also share the results of user surveys.



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Finding a balance: centralized IT support for decentralized units and the liaison program at Tulane University
        Adam Krob (Tulane University)

Management

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 10


In most universities, there is a tension between the local technology support needs of individual colleges, schools, and departments and the demands of the entire community. We have all witnessed attempts to overcome this tension by centralizing and decentralizing support like a pendulum.

Two years ago, the central technology organization created a new liaison program at Tulane University to find a balance between the demands on central technology support and the needs of the individual school, department, or division. We created a system in which there is local control—decentralized units fund the partial or whole position—and centralized management and integration into the support structure. The program has exploded over the past years, growing from one liaison to eight. Three areas of the liaison program that have contributed to its success in achieving this balance are:

-the application of specific practices and approaches to technology support
-the combination of decentralized budgetary control with centralized management and training responsibility
-the allocation of both central IT staff and liaisons to resolve issues and complete problems


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Online Student Enrollment System
        Then H.H.Patrick , Samantha (Swinburne University of Technology [Malaysia])

Technology

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 9



Our Online student enrollment system enables students to enroll into their subjects prior to the commencement of their semesters. This enrollment system not only allows international students to enroll through internet without traveling to the campus but also incorporates the business rules. These business rules cover a wide range of regulations and policy such as subject pre-requisite, student's payment status, course coordinator's decision and the correspondence of students' seniority to the intended enrolling subjects. Besides business rules, the system also incorporates various notification mechanisms like Short Messaging Service (SMS) and Email. XML is used to store the business rule and thus allow the portability of the system interface to wider range of devices such as Personal Device Assistant (PDA). The interface auto-detects the user's device either PC/laptop or much smaller screen device such as PDA. In short, the enrollment system backend engine runs based on the business rules and front-end engine runs to provide high satisfaction user experience. With the business and user interface, the system is able to run the workflow of student enrollment from the online enrollment form to approval workflow cycle running parallel with the notification capability.

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Better Results in Mathematics Lessons with a Virtual Personal Teacher
        Serge Linckels , Christoph Meinel (Hasso-Plattner-Institute (HPI), University of Potsdam)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 12


In this paper we present the results of an experiment made with our e-librarian service "MatES", an e-Learning tool on fractions in mathematics. MatES allows students to enter complete questions in natural language and returns semantically pertinent multimedia results which explain the answer to the users' question.

The efficiency of MatES was proven by benchmark tests. From 229 different user questions, the system returned the correct answer for 97% of the questions, and only one answer (the best one) for nearly half of the questions.

A class of 22 students took part in the five week experiment.
Students were autonomous and learned through exploratory exercises. Students asked MatES questions. The multimedia explanations yielded by MatES allowed the students to acquire new knowledge, and to complete the exercises.

At the conclusion of the experiment, MatES was confirmed as an efficient e-librarian service. The students used MatES as a tool that helps them to do better in mathematics. We measured relevant improvements in the students' school results over the period they used MatES, compared to the school results before they used MatES. One of the main reasons for this excellent result is that the students were more motivated, and therefore put more effort into learning and acquiring new knowledge. The students also stated that MatES explained better, and that they understood the course content more easily.



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Oh, My Aching Laptop: Expanding the Boundaries of Campus Computing Ergonomics
        Pat Wyatt , Kim Todd, Tabatha Verbick (Northwest Missouri State University)

Training and Documentation

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 14


Feeling pins-and-needles in your fingers, having a sore back, blurry vision or aching wrists are common symptoms for many employees in the technology field. Such aches and pains are often warning signs that significant injuries are just one more mouse click away. Until recently, such ailments have not traditionally been considered common symptoms for students. Yet, with the rapid growth of game-playing software, computer-related coursework and online classes, which cause students to spend longer hours in front of a computer, repetitive stress injuries are inevitable. Consequently, such injuries should and must be considered in the educational environment by department heads and information technology personnel. Repetitive stress injuries are of particular concern at Northwest Missouri State University, where all campus-housed residents are provided with campus-owned notebook computers. Notebook computers can increase the chances of injury since the monitor and keyboard cannot be positioned separately. Also, due to the notebook computer's portability students can work in locations and positions that can increase the risk of acquiring repetitive stress injuries from neck pain to carpal tunnel syndrome. Computer users need more education and training in the science of ergonomics in order to avoid injuries.

In this paper, users and educators will learn techniques for adapting workspaces and habits in order to perform at optimum efficiency. The paper will define the problems and costs associated with workspace ergonomics and offer solutions to these problems. Additionally, the authors will discuss techniques to avoid repetitive stress injuries and how to effectively train users before injuries occur.



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Exploring the Training Wilderness
        Jennifer McIntosh-Elkins , Karen McRitchie (Valparaiso University; Grinnell College)

Training and Documentation

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 9


Exploring the student training wilderness takes courage, determination and creativity. Bring your compass and let experienced explorers from two colleges in the Midwest: Grinnell College and Valparaiso University, guide you through the training forest showing you how to provide training even if you are on the economy trek.

Experience some interactive techniques that go beyond the traditional training methods, collect tools that you can add to your backpack of ideas, and also learn how to add some fun to your training sessions so that learning goals are better achieved. Learn how to identify and involve experts from the outside to enhance your training program with diverse perspectives and knowledge. Your trek into the wilderness will allow you to learn tactics to encourage participation, design ideas for sessions for all learning styles and how to get more from your training investment.

The unique challenges of providing training to a staff who, by their very nature, will be moving on after a few years and maintaining an even level of customer service will be covered in this journey. Providing students with the appropriate customer service skills, technical skills and knowledge will give them the survival skills they need to successfully negotiate the ever growing wilderness known as Information Technology.



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Student Leadership Teams: Does Their Benefit Outweigh Their Egos?
        Karen McRitchie (Grinnell College)

Management

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 5


Creating and managing a team of students to help supervise other student staff has both positive and negative aspects. It is a necessity for those Information Technology (IT) departments who do not have enough full time staff to fulfill this role, yet it can present some interesting challenges in management. At Grinnell College, the IT department employs approximately 75 students as Technology Consultants who staff general computer labs, the helpdesk, library computing facilities, digital art lab, and the Audio Visual Center.

The leadership team at Grinnell College was started to provide better services and supervision to the student staff, which originally was only about 25 students in 1997. It consisted of two “supervising” students: Senior Coordinator and Junior Coordinator. As the services provided by student staff expanded and the number of staff tripled, a team of 6 supervisors was created. The leadership team is now comprised of an Administrative Coordinator, two Training Coordinators, Technical Coordinator, AV Center Coordinator, Helpdesk Coordinator and an Associate Coordinator who is usually in training for one of the other positions.

This team is an asset most of the time and has allowed our Technology Consultant program to flourish, however there are some challenges in managing such a team: hiring the right students, training and professional development, personality conflicts, and most of all egos. The problems also change from year to year as the team evolves, but a good student leadership team can become an important part of management.



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Facilitating Innovative Faculty Projects: An Information Technology Perspective
        Kenneth Janz (Indiana State University)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 12


The Center for Instruction, Research, and Technology (CIRT) assist faculty with their integration of emerging and innovative technologies into instruction and research activities. This support ranges from High Performance Computing (HPC) to visualization services. CIRT also provides academic programming support to the University community. Additionally, one of the center's main goals is to continually explore and evaluate new and emerging technologies to support teaching, research, and student learning. This presentation will cover the process of working with faculty on research proposals and include a demonstration of several innovative projects developed by CIRT. Examples of a few projects that will be demonstrated include:
- Child Art Project - A Web-accessed database containing digitally copied artwork made by children. Each work is referenced in various categories. Visitors can select categories and the system displays matching artwork for comparisons.
- Phylogenic Analysis Software - CIRT staff have written multiple programs that work in parallel with other custom programs to analyze large genome data sets used in the life sciences.
- Dyslexia / ADHD Research Laboratory - CIRT funded and developed a research laboratory for the Educational and School Psychology department. The lab uses an eye-tracker to study the differences in eye movement of children affected by dyslexia and ADHD.
- Web-controlled robotics - CIRT recently developed a web interface that allows the control of robotic devices over the internet. The interface includes live camera feeds which allow the user to interact with the robotic device in real time.



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Creating a Positive First Impression of Information Technology Support at the Start of School
        Kenneth Janz , Emily Gruenert (Indiana State University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



To capture student’s attention, the Office of Information Technology (OIT) at Indiana State University (ISU), created a Start of School Event. This event has been conducted the last three years at ISU. A Start of School Committee comprised of members of the various units in the OIT started the planning process. This committee designed and coordinated the activities of the event. One of the centerpieces of the event was a Technology Information Tent. At the tent, OIT distributed Microsoft Campus Agreement (MSCA) software, safe computing CDs, Student Technology Guides, provided technical help, gave away prizes, answered general questions about the campus, and offered the opportunity for students to be photographed with the school mascot. In addition, the University’s radio station WISU broadcasted live from the tent. This array of activities created a carnival atmosphere for the students. For five days starting the Sunday before classes started, a steady stream of student! s took advantage of easy access computer support. Over 50 OIT staff members assisted with the tent over the five days. Over 2,400 students signed contracts and received the MSCA CDs. Another 2,500 asked for assistance and received answers to such technical questions as how to get connected to the Indiana State network or remove viruses from their personal computers, and many brought their laptops by for hands-on support. The presentations will focus on the activities, products, and survey results of the event as well as the project plan for the event.


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BITS Based Imaging Process
        Tim Leamy , Rob Smith, Allan Chen (UC Davis, Stanford University)

Technology

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 9


Many universities use Symantec Ghost to image PCs in their campus computer labs. However, issues related to network traffic, multicasting, and file size create numerous difficulties when transferring image files.
Tim Leamy at University of California, Davis (UC Davis) created a system using Microsoft's Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) to transfer Ghost images to PC. Allan Chen and Rob Smith have adapted the system to work at Stanford.
The system uses BITS to transfer Symantec Ghost .gho and .ghs files to a FreeDOS partition on the client PC. The machine then rebuilds itself at the next reboot locally, making for extremely fast imaging times.
BITS, which utilizes standard HTTP protocols, runs in the background using available network bandwidth. This leaves the workstation available for use by students. Because the file transfer is via HTTP, it works over all types of networking and is very robust. The image files themselves live on a standard web server. Actual downtime of the client is generally less than 10 minutes.
Stanford University has adapted the UC Davis solution in a number of ways. The majority of the work has been in dealing with larger (14GB) image sizes and integrating the scripts and utilities into the Stanford environment. Scripting functionality has remained the same, though many of the actual scripts have been modified.
This presentation will examine the original impetus and implementation at UC Davis, and Stanford's experiences in modifying that process to fit our needs.

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Leveraging our campus I.T. in the wake of the storm
        Stacey Morales , Scott Delaney (Louisiana State University)

Management

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 5



In the hours after Hurricane Katrina demolished the Louisiana Coast LSU soon became the center of recovery and relief efforts for the state. This was obviously an effort that spanned all parts of the institution, but as one would expect, information and communication were key to the success of all the parties involved.

In our discussion we would like to tell our story of how a LSU's I.T. resources were key to the recovery efforts in our state.

Our organization was equipped to put phones, computers, telephone and networking services in the hands of the volunteers who were administering the triage hospital and acute care facilities on our campus. A hotline was established and manned 24 hours in the weeks after the storm where citizens could get information. Our network operations center opened their doors to fellow universities in the state to recover their systems and re-direct their web pages and communications. Computer labs were dismantled and the systems used in all aspects of the recovery where PC's were needed. We leveraged our partnerships with vendors like Microsoft, IBM and Cisco to get equipment and supplies where it needed to go.

We would like to share our story with others so that they will hear first hand what LSU I.T. did in the wake of the storm. We hope this will open discussion and dialog that will help other universities understand the power of their resources should they be faced with a disaster of this magnitude.


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Creating Synergy to Make I.T. Happen
        Stacey Morales , Toni Sparks (Louisiana State University)

Management

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 5



Synergy - The working together of two or more things, people, or organizations, especially when the result is greater than the sum of their individual effects or capabilities.

At LSU we are making I.T. happen by working together with other organizations on campus to create rich technology spaces where students have access to not only traditional computer labs, but added functions such as social spaces, mobile device circulation, high end media development and output, vending services, digital art gallery, technical support and library reference.

This year LSU will create an Information Commons in our main campus library. The success of this project is the result of a long dialog and working relationship with various organizations that include the LSU Library Administration, Contracted Auxiliary Services, Copier management, Graphic Services, College of Art and Design, Information Technology Services, and the Student Technology Fee Committee.

LSU would like to present on how they have created a synergy with organizations on campus that will create spaces where students can gather to collaborate and learn in settings that they are most comfortable and most productive. All of the participating organizations have recognized needs in their areas that without a synergetic effort might have not been possible or resulted in failures. We will speak on why this synergetic solution has worked and reflect on past projects that did not work because it was not a coordinated effort and was missing aspects or functions that could have made it a success.


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Using Remote Installation Services for Windows to Streamline Installations in the UTPB Computer Science Research Lab
        Cherry Owen , Dustin Piper (The University of Texas of the Permian Basin)

Technology

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 9

The Computer Science Research Lab at The University of Texas of the Permian Basin (UTPB) is operated by three part-time student assistants with minimal faculty supervision. This lab supports seven Windows and Sun Solaris servers and approximately thirty workstations within one subnet. Installing updates and new software on each workstation became very time consuming, so research was done on the Remote Installation Services (RIS) included with Windows 2000 Server add-on components. At first, it was difficult to get the RIS component to work within the domain environment because the inaccuracies of provided documentation caused many unanticipated problems. There were also problems with various hardware configurations on the different workstations, such as hyper-threaded processors on limited workstations. After a year of diligent effort, we have filled in the blanks in the provided documentation and have successfully implemented the RIS component. If a workstation has problems, we just reinstall the entire operating system, complete with customized programs, security settings, and operating system updates from a list provided by the server and little manual intervention is needed to start this process. Unattended installation scripts will provide answers to the server and the client in regards to where files will be stored and what settings the workstation will have when the process has been completed. The paper will discuss the procedure for setting up the RIS component, including the needed modifications/additions to the available RIS documentation.


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"WinSun": Deploying the Windows Desktop on a Sun Ray
        Anita Schwartz , Carol Jarom (University of Delaware)

Technology

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 9

The User Services department at the University of Delaware is experimenting with replacing standard “fat” Windows PCs with Sun Ray thin clients connecting to a Windows 2003 server running Terminal Services. This allows the Sun Rays to connect to a Sun Ray server configured with Control Access Mode (CAM) to run a remote desktop session on the Windows 2003 server. Our objective is to establish a cost effective, reliable solution with minimal impact on staff resources. Our goal is to maintain the Windows desktop on the Windows 2003 server instead of on many individual fat PCs. This should reduce staff support time, minimize security vulnerabilities, require user authentication and reduce hardware costs due to scalability. Our initial phase is to replace 14 express stations with Sun Ray thin clients in the fall of 2006. Express stations are Windows PCs dedicated to provide a limited amount of computing services to the user with an automatic generic login. These include browsing the web, reading e-mail and printing using specific application viewers that don’t allow editing. Based on the results of our initial testing, we hope to be able to replace an entire un-staffed Windows PC computing lab with Sun Ray thin clients as our next phase.




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Moving Beyond the Boundaries: Student, Staff and Faculty Technology Education
        Michelle Eccles (Washington State University Vancouver)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



How do you offer technology education to 2000+ students, staff and faculty in a timely and resource-saving way and maintain quality and relevance?

The Past:WSU Vancouver Information Services (VIS) began offering free technology workshops to small groups of students more than 10 years ago. These workshops began with simple introductions to Microsoft Office software programs and Library research and database instruction.

The Present:The workshops have since grown to an offering of 45 to 50 workshops each Fall and Spring semester and include faculty and staff as well as students. More offerings include advanced Office training, Web page design and coding, Image processing, Library advanced searching and more. Workshops run from 1 hour to 4 hours depending on the subject matter and are well attended. Online documentation and registration is available. Certificates of Completion for Microsoft Office, Web Pages and Advanced Web Pages are available. Some academic departments now integrate the VIS workshops into their curriculum giving students credit for attendance and an opportunity to increase skills.

The Future:As the campus population increases, the demand for Workshops also increases. VIS is now working on providing online instruction modules, DVD instruction disks and discussing the possible uses of Podcasts for instruction. VIS is moving beyond the boundaries of traditional technology education to expand opportunity, skill and experience to the students, staff and faculty of WSU Vancouver.


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Increasing Resources in Times of Budgetary Constraints
        John V. Samuel , Kevin J. Wilhite (Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana)

Customer Support

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 7



Institutions of higher education continue to be pressed by shrinking financial resources on one side and rising costs on the other. These pressures can prove insurmountable when the demands of researchers, as well as a highly competitive job market, are taken into account. One of the costs associated with higher education is software acquisition for research and instruction. The increasing complexity of instructional and research demands often requires the purchase of a variety of software packages that can easily deplete a departmental or campus budget. This realization may prompt administrators to pursue a one-size-fits-all mind set with regard to software purchasing, with the result of curtailing or limiting research. In spite of scarce finances, faculty, staff, and students at Indiana University (IU) can afford to choose from a wide variety of statistical and mathematical software packages. They can purchase or lease these packages for home and/or office use at a cost fa! r below the standard educational discount offered by many vendors, and can also receive installation and computing support. Thanks to the administrators for the approval of a proposal to set up a Center on the main campus to provide statistical consulting and computing support for research and instruction. The presenters will share how this program has evolved into a truly multi-campus software distribution service at IU, and how the program's success saves millions of dollars each year.




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Needs Assessment for Campus Wide Network Services at Brigham Young University Hawaii Using IEEE 802.16 Wireless Network Infrastructure
        Gary Ka Wai Wong , N/A (Brigham Young University Hawaii)

Technology

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 9



Wireless technology continues to improve as technology advances throughout the world. Brigham Young University Hawaii (BYUH) is approaching the point where it will be sufficiently mature technologically to benefit from a campus-wide wireless network. In preparation of this, a survey was conducted to determine the trend of mobile computing and wireless communication among members of the BYUH community and the need for a campus-wide IEEE 802.16, “WiMax,” network. In this paper, we discuss the survey results as it relates to readiness of the campus and the need for a campus-wide wireless network. In addition, security issues as they relate to IEEE 802.16 are addressed. Security is a primary concern for a campus-wide network. Finally, a campus needs assessment is presented. This needs assessment will be used to encourage BYUH as well as other universities to prepare for the next generation of wireless networks using 802.16.


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Duck, Duck, Goose: No Need to Run from Quality Control
        Janiele Buckner, Nathan Carpenter, Kate Ower (CITES, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 10



Providing great customer service is vital to building a trusting relationship between you and your customers. But how does a help desk ensure that its customers are receiving the help that they need?

The CITES Help Desk at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign instituted a quality control program to ensure that our 5000 customer contacts per month receive consistently excellent customer service. In our Quality Assurance Control Kit (QuACK) program, we review our student consultants’ tickets and knowledgebase articles for a number of factors including timeliness, clarity of communication, problem solving and successful resolution.

Our presentation will describe the evolution of our QuACK program, the evaluation criteria that we use, and the improvement we have seen in our communications with our customers.


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Specialized Computer Labs: Care and Feeding
        Trevor Murphy , Sharron Macklin (Williams College)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 10


This paper is a brief overview of some of the challenges and successes related to the support of a Geographic Information Systems PC lab and a music technology Mac lab at Williams College. Specialized computer labs can come with some surprising issues that set them apart from the general academic computer lab. The GIS lab and music technology labs at Williams have provided many examples of such challenges. These challenges include:
• Finding academic pricing for non academic software.
• Creating secure lab spaces.
• Handling unusual license management, even dongles or hasps, and software management schemes that involve locking software to a specific machine id making the creation of an image for the lab a challenge.
• Working around security issues with products that assume that all users have full administrative access to the lab computers.
• Solving peripheral software and hardware interface challenges.
• Training users and creating effective documentation.
• Troubleshooting non standard hardware and software intensive lab stations.
• Creating and deploying and image for a specialty lab.
The authors share their experience supporting these labs and confronting some of these issues at Williams College.



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EMS: A Homegrown Identity Management Solution
        William Murphy (Salem State College)

Technology

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 9

In 2005 Salem State College upgraded a nine year old email system to Novell's GroupWise. In addition, the College had recently implemented a One Card, web portal, and student administration systems.
As we moved forward with these initiatives, we hoped to establish formal user management policies. An IT audit identified a number of problems which needed to be addressed. In the past each IT system was isolated, so users could have different usernames in each system and there were no policies for adding or removing users from these systems. We found:
* End users with different usernames in each system
* Users who were deceased or no longer employed
* Users added or removed from systems without authorization from Human Resources (HR)
* Users authenticated before they were given College credentials (email address, ID card, etc.)
We suspect these challenges/opportunities might exist at other institutions of higher education.
With very little time and no budget, we developed EMS, the Employee Management System, a homegrown system designed to authenticate new users, issue usernames, communicate status changes with trusted systems, and continually audit the list of users.
Cooperation within IT, and with HR, has helped to make EMS the central point of contact for all IT resources. This system is a work in progress and we are now looking at how this system might be used in other areas.
This presentation will include a demonstration of EMS, discussions on where we are, where we're going, and lessons learned along the way.

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ePortfolio: Expanding the Educational Vision (Our Educational Saga)
        Wendy Pearle , Beth Rugg (Ithaca College)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 12

Ithaca College, guided by our vision of student excellence and our professional certification programs, set out to use existing and supported technology to help students create and publish ePortfolios. An ePortfolio is an online multimedia-capable portfolio that showcases a student's collection of academic learning, achievements, knowledge, and skills. Depending on the viewing audience, ePortfolios can also be used by external evaluation agencies for institutional accreditation, by the Development Office for marketing, by Admissions for recruiting, by the Provost's Office for teacher evaluation, or by students applying for postgraduate opportunities. Information Technology Services (ITS) provided the ePortfolio service to the community with the belief that "if we build it, they will come." Through trial and error, we developed a student-friendly easy-to-use tool. We will discuss our vision, research, initial pilot program, re-focus, additional research, second pilot program and the subsequent creation of the Ithaca College ePortfolio Builder.


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Residential installations for network access on campus
        Sean Phalen (Rollins College)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



The process of installing network access on Rollins campus has changed dramatically over the past six years. During the spring semester of 2000, the IT department was actually going to the residence halls and performing the installations. This was time consuming, expensive, and required two technicians. Over the summer break in 2000, the entire process was reinvented and put into action during the fall semester 2000. Instead of IT going to the students, the students came to IT. A web form was created for sign up, a central location was setup for installs, and same day completion was promised. The process proved to be a success and was repeated and modified over the years. As the installations progressed and the hardware and software changed, the process was adapted to the change. An installation CD was created, the cost dropped, software was added, support continued, and all proved successful. Currently at Rollins College the IT Department provides a free self-installation CD with anti-virus and anti-spyware software and now there is web access and computer registration on line. The college has also upgraded the network and provides wireless access across campus.


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Digi Get It? Technology Training
        Sarah Mansell (Wake Forest University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



The orientation schedule for new Wake Forest University students in the fall of 2005 was shortened by one full day, thereby significantly reducing the time allowed for training students about campus technology and their new ThinkPad computer. The Information Systems Department, along with the Technology Training Task Force, determined that educational videos - produced by students for students - would be an efficient and effective way to convey much of the information. Supervised by the Manager for IS Communications and funded by a University grant to promote the ethical and responsible use of computing resources, the project employed five students who wrote and produced four videos during the spring of 2005. The videos, titled “Digi Get It?”, cover four of the most important computing topics on a college campus: Viruses, spamming and spoofing; general care of the ThinkPad, legal downloading, and the importance of backing up your data.

Information Systems departments on college campuses are constantly faced with changing needs and demands related to communicating a plethora of important technology messages. These videos succeeded in communicating those important issues in a concise, and more importantly, memorable way. The lesson of Digi Get It? is to consider unconventional means to achieve the same goal. Our Digi Get It? project succeeded in large part because we allowed our students to have much of the control over the manner in which the message was delivered. The video series was recognized with a Silver Award and three honorable mentions by Educause in 2006.


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Using Video Podcasts to Enhance Consulting
        Ron Nichols , Larry Larraga (University of Delaware)

Training and Documentation

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 14

At the University of Delaware we are constantly looking to enhance our consulting efforts in new ways. Try as we might there were just some things that users couldn't seem to grasp from our web documentation. We came to the conclusion that small tutorial videos would help but we didn't have the expertise. If we were going to pursue this, we needed to make sure the videos we created were of a decent quality. In this paper/presentation we will explain how we created a video podcasting team from our existing staff and came up with producers, editors, and videographers. We ran into quite a few stumbling blocks, but we learned as went along and started to produce videos that have been very well received. We started off with some basic equipment and software that we already had and then purchased some additional equipment over time. We will explain how we created the team and provide details about the entire process from choosing the topic to posting our final production on our "Consulting-on-Demand" web site.

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VOIP in a University Call Center
        Ray Gable , Brett Williams, Jace Myran (University of Wyoming)

Technology

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 9



Can VOIP (voice over Internet Protocol) actually work in a university call center? There are a number of issues surrounding implementing VOIP. This session will discuss the type of equipment needed, both software and hardware. Detailed information about how a university went digital.

We’ll start with what switches, servers, personnel, and maintenance were required. Then move on to the installation. There is a physical infrastructure that has to exist for VOIP, including integrating analog phone systems, 100mbps network, and workstations.

We’ll devote some time to the call center workstation, their requirements and specifications. The computers running the softphone utility have to be robust, fast and clean.

No VOIP discussion would be complete without a report on the softphone utility. The University of Wyoming choose Frontrange Solutions Contact Center. We’ll go over its usage, answering calls, transfers, voice mail, feedback to the client and specialist, and what reporting statistics are available. There are a number of advantages over a standard analog system, including having a virtual helpdesk with the ability to remotely bring extra specialists into the call center and provide second-level support.

We’ll discuss potential pitfalls such as network lag and disruptions, computer crashes, and windows OS problems.

The University of Wyoming has tested multiple lines of headsets. Since these headsets must be USB in order to interact with the softphone, there are limitations. Should you choose wired or wireless headsets?

Our discussion will conclude with a feasibility discussion on VOIP and prices involved with implementation.


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Implementation and Experience with the Terminal Registration System with Web Interface
        Naomi Fujimura , Tatsuya OKA, Zen-ichi HIRAYAMA, and Masa (Kyushu University)

Technology

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 9

The cost of operation and management are growing rapidly in proportion to the increase of the number of network terminals connected to the network. We hope to improve the quality of network service, but it is difficult because reasons such as manpower and budget limitations. The number of staff members in our information processing center decreased when the organization was restructured in October 2003.
To address this situation, we implemented a new network terminal registration system with a web interface. On our campus, users have to register the MAC address to get the DHCP IP address for their personal computers. Prior to the new terminal registration system, it took several days to register them. However, the network terminal registration procedure is now fully automated for DHCP where users can connect their personal computers to the network in a few minutes. The network terminal registration for fixed IP address is almost automated and reduced in the operation time. As a result, we decreased the staff member's workload and improved the throughput time to register a new network terminal.
The system also contains detailed information including the update status of anti-virus software of each computer in a network terminal database. This approach improves the security of our network system. In this paper, we describe the system structure, facility, user interface, and some experience with the system.
Categories and Subject Descriptors

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Collecting Students’ Degree of Comprehension with Mobile Phones
        Naomi Fujimura , Masahiro Doi (Kyushu University)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 12



It is important for teachers to know the status about how well students understood the contents in the classroom. It is possible to collect such data with Web interface in a PC room, but it is difficult for teachers in a traditional lecture room. Mobile phones with the internet facility are very popular among students in Japan. We implemented the classroom support system to collect student's degree of comprehension with the internet facility of mobile phone. We devised this system to offer better ease of use for both students and teachers. For instance, teachers can prepare the questionnaire with Web browser interface and edit the contents and structure very comfortably. The system uses the terminal identification number, which is assigned by the vendors and unique among whole mobile phones, to make the usability much better for students. After the lecture, teachers can get the summarized and detailed result of questionnaire with Web interface. Teachers can now get the feedback data from students about the lecture with this system in every lecture and improve the class. We are using this system in several class rooms. We report the system outline and the experience with the result of this system.



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Adding Fun and Games to Training Programs
        Michael Curtin , Nathan Carpenter, Chris Ritzo (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Training and Documentation

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 14

The CITES Help Desk is a constantly changing environment and keeping our student employees up to date is a challenge. We want a fun way to reinforce our training program, provide new information on existing services, and foster better teamwork among our staff. To solve this dilemma, the Help Desk develops web-based learning games. Our presentation will showcase the development of these games and highlight the lessons learned from two divergent types of games.

The Dockside Mystery was played in late 2005 and featured a fully integrated storyline with interactive characters, 3D environments, and an automated testing and grading system. Prizes were awarded to the students who earned a top score. With our spring 2006 game, Stump the Chump, we took a dissimilar approach. Players relied on their peers to answer work and non-work related quiz questions in a game-show atmosphere in which the students were pitted against the full-time staff. Contestants competed for bragging rights only.

Home-grown learning games are a possibility for any group which has the creativity, drive, and means to develop them. Our newest titles illustrate the wide range of approaches that can be taken to meet the challenge of teaching through fun.
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Re-Take Control of Your Classroom Technology
        Michael Ciocco , Neil Toporski, Kenur Talsania (Rowan University)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 10


Instructional Technology at Rowan University strives to empower faculty by making classroom technology readily available and easy to use. Until recently, using technology in one of our 80 Technology Enhanced Classrooms (TEC) was typically a frustrating experience for faculty. The controls for projectors, computers, VCRs, CD players, DVD players, and other technologies were often complicated and varied from classroom to classroom. Extensive TEC training was often required but difficult to generalize. Typically, the result was support and maintenance nightmares. In 2005, it became essential to create a new model of classroom technology.

In the wake of the mentioned issues, Rowan University developed a “simple” TEC model that improves access to equipment and streamlines the use of technology in the classroom. This new model meets the following goals: (1) to provide fast, seamless access to classroom technology for the faculty by standardizing technology and function of all TEC classrooms, (2) to minimize the need for training and on-site user support, and (3) to create an inexpensive, low maintenance environment to minimize costs, service and repairs. Rowan is currently implementing this new model in phases; the first of which involves the implementation of standardized technology choices and its benefits such as cost, support, and maintenance reduction.

This paper will discuss the approach and implementation of phase one of the new, “simple” Rowan University TEC model as well as insight into future plans for the model.



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Reactive to Proactive Support: A Corn Dance
        Michael Blanco , Kay White (Linfield College)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 7


The Linfield College help desk was disorganized and inefficient. The number of IT department personnel had remained static while the staff, faculty, and student populations grew. We could not keep up with the growing demand for service, our work queues grew longer, and we could not stay on top of viruses and malware. Our mission was to reinvent the support desk to meet the growing needs of the campus but we were technicians, not managers and this project was outside our experience.

There were limited resources available for our reinvention project. The IT staff was few in number with only a couple of student workers for assistance. Money for IT infrastructure upgrades was in short supply. We spent our time in crisis management rather than preventative maintenance.

The Fall 2005 SIGGUCS conference presented a variety of new ideas that gave us the direction we needed to make our support desk project succeed. Returning to campus, we had a fresh vision for our IT support desk. We automated our network security with Cisco Clean Access and developed an assembly line for repair work with increased student worker technicians. TheBrain(r) software centralized support desk management and helped us develop "on demand" phone support. The campus support desk now offers increased network security, a wider range of services and faster repair times. By altering our view of how people, hardware/software, and clients interrelate we were able to expand the boundaries of the service our support desk offered.

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An Experience of Monitoring a University Network Security Using a Commercial Service and DIY Monitoring
        Masato Masuya , Takashi Yamanoue and Shinichiro Kubota (Kagoshima University)

Technology

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 9

Monitoring network security of a university is one of the most important jobs for the network managers. Without the monitoring, it is hard to keep the network safe. It is common that the security policy of a university has the term which states that monitoring network security is a mandate. However it is very hard to monitor every part of a university's network by the limited number of staff and a limited amount of time and expense. In order to cope with these problems, we bought a commercial network security monitoring service for the doorway of our campus network and we are doing Do It Yourself (DIY) monitoring with free software for the inside of the network. By the commercial monitoring service, we could reach 24 hours a day and 365 days a year monitoring at the doorway. By the DIY monitoring, we could realize the precise monitoring of inside network, which is hard to realize by the commercial monitoring, because there are Network Address Translations (NATs). If an incident was found by the combination of these monitoring, we could deal with it as fast as we can. By these efforts, there was no serious incident such as unauthorized manipulation of important web pages by crackers and leaking serious personal information by using P2P file sharing software last year. In this paper, we report the experience of our monitoring.

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Providing Support to the Expanding University
        Louis Kelly, M.Ed. , Sandra Johnson, M.Ed. (Arizona State University)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 7



Faculty support, classroom remodels and upgrades, student-owned computers, wireless networking, and other demands for campus technology are increasing on campuses across the country. To provide support for these and other technology needs of the campus community, Information Technology (IT) departments have had to stretch their resources. Arizona State University is one college that is currently in the process of dealing with these “growing pains.” To handle the rising need for services, the University Technology Office (UTO) at Arizona State University has begun to redesign its model of support into a robust, expandable model that will grow with demand in the coming years. For the expandable model to be successful, careful planning is required from everyone within the department. Such planning allows the department not only to create an expandable model of support, but to create it around the universities overall missions and goals.


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Being There: A “Teach Them To Fish . . .” Approach to Training and Support Using WebEx©, Videoconferencing and the Telephone
        Lorna Olsen (North Dakota State University)

Training and Documentation

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 14

The Challenge: As training and support staff at North Dakota State University we are continuously “expanding our boundaries” by providing more of the one-on-one and just-in-time training our clients want and need. Unfortunately, while our boundaries are constantly expanding, our budget is not.

We provide training and support not only to our on-campus clients, but to our external clients on 11 campuses within our University System, and county Extension Service offices throughout the state of North Dakota as well.

One Solution: The NDSU ITS training staff of two depends heavily on WebEx© (a Web Conferencing and Remote Support application), videoconferencing, and the telephone to conduct successful training sessions at remote locations without traveling long distances, and to provide one-on-one training on demand while responding to support requests received via an online help ticketing system, email, and by telephone.

Combining the web conferencing capabilities of WebEx© with videoconferencing allows us to provide training at a distance while saving manpower, travel time, and money.

WebEx© also allows us to use a “Teach Them To Fish . . .” philosophy to provide remote support via telephone and the Web. Rather than simply “fixing the problem” for them, we use WebEx© to help our clients learn by doing. We can see what they see while they fix their own problem with our assistance.

This paper elaborates on this training and support philosophy, and details what works and what does not.

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SafetyNET - Designing and Implementing a Technology Support Program for Students
        Joshua Hartranft , Veronica Longenecker (Millersville University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



With the explosion of viruses and spyware, universities face the challenge of assisting students with maintaining and troubleshooting their own personal computers. To address this challenge, Millersville University developed a SafetyNET program funded through their student technology fee. The program’s goal is to minimize computer downtime by offering computer software support, information, and education to all currently enrolled students.

Millersville University addressed design challenges including scope of support, appropriate location for the SafetyNET center and full-time and student staff. Some of our implementation issues included advertising this new service, developing tools and procedures, and assessing the success of the program.

Some of our future ideas include developing a larger SafetyNET center where we can provide small group training sessions, discussions, and entertainment events as well as coordinating and collaborating with Student Affairs and Academic Affairs for various activities.


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Moving IT Beyond IT
        Jen Whiting (Princeton University)

Management

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 5



"Excellent problem solving skills, critical thinker, comfortable with modern operating systems and applications, a strong understanding of the campus' technical infrastructure, knowledge of the campus business models, excellent customer service skills..." Does this sound like a job description for a help desk employee? An IT project manager? How about a Campus Life administrator or a manager of Customer Service in the Facilities department?

The job skills developed in the central IT organization are quickly becoming the cornerstone of every job description on campus. Can you imagine if your campus life administrator had the same understanding of the technology tools available as your best help desk employee? Would processes and organizational challenges be handled differently if technology were a tool and not an impediment? As you look to advance your career, consider the skill set you have developed in the central IT organization. Do you think it would benefit the university if you took that knowledge to another department? You bet!

Information technology is the foundation on which our universities and colleges are building. Your IT knowledge - ACDs, web servers, networking - mixed with the problem solving skills that are inherent in any help desk environment positions you to add immediate value to many other areas on campus. This paper addresses the benefits of transitioning IT beyond the central IT organization - and how your career can continue to grow - as IT moves into every facet of our institutions.


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Using an Automatic Marking System For Programming Courses
        Hidekatsu Koike , Kiyoshi Akama, Hiko Morita, and Katsunor (Sapporo Gakuin University)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 12



All students (about 1000) at Sapporo Gakuin University are required to take Computer Literacy. In Hokkaido University, we teach courses, such as AI Programming, with approximately 100 students. By using automatic marking systems of our own design we can check student work and obtain the results immediately. It reduces our labor, enables us grasp individual students' learning states, and allows us to tailor our instruction to each student's needs.

Automatic marking is a key technology for getting to know the current individual learning state of each student in a large class. By using automatic marking we can conduct short tests many times, mark the tests automatically, and collect detailed information of the learning states of students from the test results. However, developing reliable and efficient marking systems is a difficult and time consuming job using conventional methods. In this paper, we introduce our automatic marking system, share our experiences using the system in our classes, and discuss the possibility of expanding its use to object-oriented programming language courses.


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Evaluating Student Employee Performance
        Helen Malin , Teresa Pearson (Indiana University)

Customer Support

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 7



At Indiana University, we supervise large numbers of student employees who work independently in remote computer lab locations. We employ a small support staff to travel among the labs to monitor consultant performance and lab environments. Compiling data gathered throughout the semester and providing evaluation input on consultant performance was a laborious task completed in the scurry of end of semester activity. There had to be a better way! What to do? First identify what our priorities were for customer service and consultant performance. Then develop a method to get information back on those priorities. An on-line Performance Record was the answer - real time and cumulative. No more waiting til the end of the semester to identify strengths, weaknesses and goals, or document recognition. Create an evaluation system that works hand-in-hand with our already active mentoring system. See how it all came together.


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IT in the ETD Puzzle: Making the Pieces Fit
        Greg Hanek , Anita Z. Schwartz, Kathy Fletcher (Indiana Univ., Univ. of Delaware, West Virginia Univ.)

Training and Documentation

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 14



While some universities moved to an ETD (Electronic Theses and Dissertations) program in the previous century, many have still not fully embraced this method. Perhaps it is a lack of awareness or coordination of services among students, departments, colleges, Graduate School, Library and IT (Information Technology). However all who have moved agree the effort spent to develop an ETD program can save money for the institution and for the students as well.

This panel session by staff from Indiana University Bloomington, University of Delaware, and West Virginia University will present their perspective on ETD at their institutions, the ETD development process and life cycle, and provide specific resources and recommendations for growing an ETD program. The primary focus of the discussion will be on the role IT support may play during the creation and publishing of an ETD, and IT support before, during and after an ETD program has been established, and how to grow that support effectively. Audience participation will be strongly encouraged.

The ETD programs of these three institutions represent different levels of program maturity and IT support in ETD programs.


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Centralized Content Management in a Decentralized IT Environment - Phone and Content Management at Texas A&M University
        Greg Deitz (Texas A&M University)

Management

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 10



Over the course of the past 2 years Texas A&M University has looked for a way to better manage all of its technology related content. This paper would be a look at the benefits and development that Plone has allowed the university to use in content all areas of content management. From being able to know the state of developing content by implementing a workflow process to having all information in one central location despite the fact that IT at Texas A&M is not centralized.

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Tapping an Unlimited Resource: the Young, Talented and Creative Mind of Student Workers!
        Teresa Pearson , Helen Malin (Indiana University)

Customer Support

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 7



At Indiana University (IU) we manage a group of 60 network consultants who are charged with connecting 12,000 residents to the IU network and managing 28 residential technology labs. In times of budget reductions and less hours to complete our ever-increasing workload, we’ve taken advantage of the opportunity to utilize the great minds we currently have in our employ; our student workers. Our diverse group of students continue to astound us with their unlimited creativity, talent and energy for developing the types of tools we need for coordination and management of our business processes. We will illustrate the online tools we use for shift reporting and monitoring, site information, FAQs, problem reporting, online chatting, and many others. Participants at SIGUCCS should walk away from this presentation with lots of ideas for managing their resources and expanding their boundaries with student involvement in tools development.


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Bringing Down the Boundaries: Creating an Environment that Brings Out the Much Needed Internal Motivation of Support Personnel
        Carrie Schulz (Rollins College)

Management

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 5



In the realm of computer support services there is a difficult challenge to get motivation going in the personnel. The reality is you can always utilize external motivators but internal motivation can not be forced and this is the motivation that makes an employee excel. What needs to be done is an environment must be created that removes boundaries and allows this internal motivation to thrive. The paper discusses what was done and is currently happening at Rollins College to create this environment which includes some successes and failures that have occurred along the way. Since motivation is a continual effort, during this presentation there will be a significant amount of time to allow for discussion and input from other colleges that are working on this same issue.


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Extreme Makeover: Lab Edition
        Pat Washburn (Cornell University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



We recently opened a new instructional computer lab in a space that was previously a departmental general lab. The conversion from general computing to an instructional layout and some new and interesting work-arounds have made this a very popular lab with instructors.

We are also in the planning stages of a new multi-media lab that should open in the spring of 2007. This space will incorporate several new features for us including flexible layouts and high end A/V equipment.

In the poster session, I will demonstrate the floor-plans and photos of the labs and discuss the new technologies that we are using and/or plan to use.


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Expanding the Boundaries Through the Use of Technology in Informal Learning Spaces
        Ari R. TenCate (University of Washington)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD


Through the use of emerging technologies, the University of Washington is promoting learning and teaching in informal learning spaces. There are several types of learning spaces that are available to students, faculty and staff such as the Learning Technologies Labs Service, Computer Classrooms, General Access Labs, and Advanced Technologies Suites. These spaces are maintained and operated by Catalyst, a department on campus, and have roughly 65,000 logins a week.

Another way Catalyst is expanding boundaries is the way these spaces are operated and maintained which is through the use of a student staff. They handle the installation, technical support, and operation of these spaces and are managed by a small full time staff.


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Applying Constructivist Principles to Reinvigorate Faculty Training
        Paul Hyde , Suzanne Nanis (University of Delaware)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 12

Traditionally, faculty training programs have used Information Technology (IT) instructor-led sessions to impart technology skills through pre-scripted exercises. The selection of topics is typically made by IT staff based on available technologies with which they are familiar. While faculty may find these learning experiences initially satisfactory, they are often challenged to make the personal connection to their specific teaching needs.

The University of Delaware has reinvigorated its summer faculty institute program by applying constructivist learning principles. The process begins with a competitive application for participation in which a faculty member identifies learning goals for their students and technical skills that the applicant would like to master along with their current skills and barriers to progress. Upon acceptance, faculty learning styles are profiled. The preliminary information is used to establish objectives, identify session topics, and assign staff roles to meet individual needs drawing from a palette of varied learning situations.

The participants are provided a laptop-based technology bundle to accomplish their goals. Faculty members are introduced to successful technology applications by their experienced colleagues. Participants work on a project of their choosing throughout the skill-based sessions.
Faculty members have the opportunity to form a cohort for continued learning and support after the institute ends.

This paper will detail the conceptual framework of the faculty institute and will describe specific tools including: participant applications, daily surveys, and companion course materials. The authors will share the strategies and challenges of applying constructivist principles to a faculty training program.

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The UTPB Computer Science Research Lab: Running on Student Power
        Cherry Owen , Doug Hale, Ilhyun Lee, Haesun Lee (The University of Texas of the Permian Basin)

Customer Support

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 10


The University of Texas of the Permian Basin (UTPB) is a small university of approximately 3,300 students. The Computer Science Research Lab at UTPB was founded by a federal grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and consists of both Windows and UNIX networks as well as a Linux Cluster and Lego Robots. The lab is used by approximately 100 Computer Science and Information Systems students and five faculty. It provides students with full access to network and database administration as well as an environment for application development. Many courses, such as Research, Software Engineering, Database Systems, Information Systems Design, and Computer Science I and II, use the lab to enhance course work and give students “hands on” experience. However, it is not possible to have a dedicated technician to manage the lab, so the Computer Science Research Lab at UTPB is operated and maintained by undergraduate student assistants with minimal faculty supervision. Even the initial set up of the lab was done by students and faculty. The department has managed to maintain a quality lab environment for the last seven years because many non-traditional UTPB students are already working and have various areas of expertise that help with lab maintenance. In addition, through a dedicated Research course, the faculty members guide students to follow defined procedures for installation and maintenance of equipment and software. The faculty would like to share the lab experiences of the last seven years with the SIGUCCS audience.



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Beyond Simple E-mail: Upgrading an Entire Campus to Enterprise E-mail and Calendaring with GroupWise
        E. Axel Larsson , Betsy Black (Drew University)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 10



Since the early 90s Drew University has provided basic email services to all students, faculty, and staff, standardizing on IMAP-based email in 1999. First supported in conjunction with the Netscape Communicator and later with Mozilla, the IMAP service has proven to be inexpensive to maintain, but had limitations. Most often cited was the lack of scheduling capabilities, resulting in many departments adopting their own unsupported solutions such as Yahoo! Calendar. The inability of the system to support “push” email services, such as BlackBerry was also a concern.

To address these issues, University Technology began migrating users to Novell GroupWise starting in Fall 2005. Pilot users, including the President’s office, were migrated in the Fall, with a phased deployment of GroupWise to all users starting in Spring 2006. A cross-departmental task force formed to manage the migration process.

This session explores how we addressed the challenges faced migrating users from a lowest common denominator IMAP service to an enterprise system such as GroupWise. We will discuss issues involved in communicating with the campus, a phased approach to migration, and the creation of customized support and training for faculty, staff, and students. The session will also address the use of web-based self-service tools to ease the transition, tactical deployment of support to address areas of need, and effective use of tools—such as desktop management and incident tracking systems—to facilitate the migration.

IT staff who are in the process of planning a campus-wide transition of email systems should attend this session.

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Dressing Up, Dressing Down: Where is Your Career Headed?
        Terry Lockard , Jen Whiting, Princeton University (see above)

Management

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 5



Your professional abilities are advertised in the first two seconds of every interaction you have at work. That's right, you have two seconds to make yourself viewed as capable, professional and ready for the next step in your career. It isn't your experience, your education or your accomplishments that people are assessing in those first two seconds - it's your image. If you are interested in moving your career forward, in advancing your professional opportunities and in simply being more respected, look in your closet. Is your wardrobe setting you up for success? Do you look as confident as you feel? If you want to move up in management, you need to stop dressing like a sys-admin. Join us as we look at one of the simplest and most straight-forward ways of advancing your career: how to dress for success.


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Enhancing Campus IT Services and Student Employee Development through Student Technology Services
        Sheree Kornkven , Jared Hall (North Dakota State University)

Management

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 5



Information technology funding seldom keeps pace with increasing demands for campus IT services. As a result, many IT departments are depending on qualified student employees to help them provide services. Information Technology Services (ITS) at North Dakota State University employs nearly 100 students in various workgroups who assist staff in providing core campus technology services. In 2004, ITS staff members recognized an opportunity to increase efficiency, save money, and raise the quality of services by implementing a Student Technology Services (STS) program. The STS program was formed to integrate all technology services provided by students into a single consistently managed program. The program is managed by two student managers and a half-time staff coordinator. Goals of the STS program include: building a more unified student workforce; providing professional development opportunities for students; enhancing communication between ITS administration, workgroups, ! and student employees; developing more equitable and consistent hiring practices; empowering students and helping them to prepare for future careers; and providing a higher level of IT services for the NDSU campus. The STS program facilitates a coordinated approach to recruiting, hiring, orienting, training, and evaluating student employees. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the STS program at NDSU, share our accomplishments thus far, and discuss the challenges as well as some positive outcomes of implementing the program.

Click to download presentation
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Architecting Change from the Inside Out
        Alison Cruess (University of North Florida)

Management

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 5



In the world of higher education technology services, we find ourselves entwined with change. Our role is usually imparting change on other members of the campus community. New systems, new software, and new instructional tools abound. We hand out change to others, however do we embrace it ourselves? How often do we internally review ourselves? Is our IT department or unit functioning cohesively? Are our employees empowered adequately to expand the boundaries and achieve results? Is management sharing the power? Do we celebrate successes? Do we really understand employee morale? Do contented cows really give better milk? This paper focuses on the fundamental strategies that University departments should employ year round for continuous improvement. Some of these elements are 1) creating a better work place; 2) hiring to fit; 3) facilitating good employee morale; 4) equipping employees for customer service; 5) communicating priorities; and 6) leading for loyalty. The IT department that architects change from the inside out will realize many benefits.


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Student Computing Purchase Programs
        Steven J. Timmins (University of Delaware)

Customer Support

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 7


There are a variety of approaches to student computer purchases in academic institutions. The goal of a purchase program might be to lower costs to students, to provide guidance for the type of equipment the student buys, to provide a uniform platform, or to simplify both hardware and software technical support. Purchase programs may be run by the University; allow for a third party, such as a bookstore or other vendor to manage offerings; or be designed so the student interacts with the manufacturer directly. Programs also vary in the way students are encouraged or even mandated to participate. The "weakest mandate" would be to allow a vendor or vendors to offer their entire product line to students at a discount. At the opposite end of the spectrum, a "strong mandate" program would require students to purchase a specifically configured model in order to attend classes. A vendor might offer one standard bundle of systems to a number of schools, or the offerings can be specifically tailored to each institution, college, department or even student. Warranty issues can be handled locally or can be directed to the vendor and/or manufacturer. This paper discusses considerations when setting up a purchase program, the advantages of different program models, and ramifications of each to students and the institution's support staff as well as the effect on institutional purchases.



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Communicating Using the Desktop Background
        Steven J. Timmins (University of Delaware)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD

Computing site desktop displays offer an easy-to-manage way to communicate with students on a variety of topics from news to policies to University resources. It is important that the messages be unobtrusive and the information fresh and pertinent. At the University of Delaware, we have implemented this in two ways: through the use of a scrolling set of topics on the desktop background and with the use of screen savers. In addition to contact information for the computing site director and other static links, which vary by location, the desktop background features a box with scrolling topics as live links. This display is shown as an item on the desktop background, so it is only visible when applications do not obscure it. Links open in a new browser window when clicked and point to web pages that provide more detailed content. The actual list of topics and the customizable background are located on a central web server and can be easily edited to change all ! desktops that point to them simultaneously. The engine which runs the scrolling sub-window is written in Macromedia Flash, so no special software is required. Topics include responsible computing, digital media rights, library resources, and news items like UDaily, the University's on-line news service. Screen savers are used in a similar manner to display messages to students in much the same way posters would.

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Automated Podcasting Solution Expands the Boundaries of the Classroom
        David Aldrich , Bradley Bell, Tim Batzel (University of Washington)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 12


The University of Washington's Classroom Support Services (UWCSS) scalable podcast solution makes the podcasting of course lectures easy for faculty by automating the capture, uploading, and delivery of MP3 audio recordings.

UWCSS staff create online class blog-space for participating instructors at the beginning of the quarter. Class location and meeting times are scheduled via a web interface. After the schedule has been established, the entire recording process happens seamlessly in the background while the instructor teaches.

The UWCSS podcast server automatically captures data from networked MP3 streaming devices, which are wired into the classroom's PA system. The audio capture routine stops at the end of class and the resulting MP3 file is scripted to be published in the corresponding class blog where it is made available to students through an RSS interface.

Students are able to listen to the MP3 recording online or they can click on the provided link to subscribe to the podcast. Once students subscribe to a podcast, subsequent lectures are delivered automatically to the students' computers. These recordings can be played on personal computers, laptops, portable MP3 players, and some cell phones.

This convenient teaching and learning technology provides students the ability to engage in lecture review and enhance their understanding of the material covered in class. The UWCSS scalable podcasting solution helps to create links between teaching and learning and expands the boundaries of the traditional classroom.



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Balancing Act: Community and Local Requirements in the Open Source Development Process
        Owen McGrath (UC Berkeley)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 7



Established best practices in software development tend to assume that a product's intended stakeholders (i.e., users, customers, and clients) are fairly well known and generally accessible. Determining the proposed software's requirements is supposed to remain largely a matter of diligent interviewing and thorough analysis. However, as open source applications are increasingly being developed by consortia of institutions in higher education, new questions arise as to who the users and stakeholders will be, how to gain their input in the design process, and how to balance local and community needs when they diverge. The requirements gathering process becomes especially challenging, particularly in determining and reconciling the needs of local users with those of the users in the wider community. This paper outlines some useful techniques for meeting these kinds of challenges. The examples described are drawn from the experience of managing tool development within the contex! t of in the Sakai Project, a higher education effort to build and share a community source framework for supporting on-line collaboration in academic courses and projects. The guidelines described in this paper offer a set of solutions that makes use of web-based project management technologies along with some planning and communication strategies to help improve the decision-making process involved in deciding whether and how to choose among proposed constraints, use cases, and feature requests.




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ExpandingTechnology Access
        Tammy M Browning , Kristina A Cunningham (University of Missouri-Columbia)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD

The University of Missouri Columbia Information Access Technology Services (IATS) Computing Sites took over an already existing laptop check out program that our Memorial Union had in place. They had 10 laptops for short term check out and it has become a very popular program. With our take over we have increased the laptops from their existing 10 to 20 notebooks and 5 ibooks. We also have worked with the Engineering Library to implement a laptop check out program in the engineering library that consists of 5 laptops with specialized software that the engineers use. With the success of this laptop check out program we are in the process of working with the student unions committee to implement a much larger program for our students, including over 100 laptops in 2008. In our programs, both at Memorial Union and the Engineering library, the laptops are checked out to students as a supplement to using the over 50 different computing sites located across campus. I will describe the specs of the laptops, our check out policies and tracking of the laptops, and discuss our expansion plans as with the teaching environment changing and laptops working better with group projects. My goal is to show how using laptops will effectively increase computing resources for students without expanding the physical space of computing sites.


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Taming the Help Desk
        Geoffrey Sperl (Wayne State University)

Management

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 5

So you were a computer geek: supporting desktops and servers, maybe some Web design… and suddenly a staff is dropped in your lap. Maybe they’re a bunch of inexperienced students and now you have to deal with their academic responsibilities and needs, then add in support for thousands of customers, and you – the geek turned manager – need your own development. Who in their right minds would want that job?

I took the job and chose to run with what I had – and it worked. For this session, I will present the secrets of our (and my) success at the Computing & Information Technology Help Desk at Wayne State University. Then, we will discuss how our methods can be applied to you and your institution’s support center.

By establishing training and mentoring for new employees and learning how to manage a staff correctly, I helped create a dynamic team and a fun workplace. You can establish positive employee performance by ensuring management is an active, visible presence. Encouraging the student staff to participate in problem solving and change management reinforces the fact that we are a team. Finally, everyone is allowed to evaluate the team’s performance, which then helps the team to improve their technical abilities and responses to our customers.

This has helped us move from an underappreciated resource four years ago to a respected authority now. You can do it, too!
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Outside the Boundaries of Printing- Not Just Your 8.5 x 11 Standard Sheet Anymore
        Kristina A Cunningham , Tammy Browning (University of Missouri-Columbia)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



Who needs more than 8.5 x 11 black and white printing? That is the question we are asked a lot here at the University of Missouri. IAT Services has noticed that more and more often printing done by students is for assignments and projects that do not use standard 8.5 x 11 paper. Even if students are using standard size paper they want to print using color.

For example classes in advertising at the School of Journalism and the department of Environmental Sciences require assignments with intense graphics that are normally out of the scope of standard size black and white printing.

In this paper we will talk about the history of the Print Smart services offered to students at the University of Missouri, discuss different printing options available to students (such as color printing, plotter printing, and wireless printing) explain how we set pricing for different printing options, and list other options students have as far as printing out of the typical printing boundaries both on and off campus.


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Expanding Communication Mechanisms: They're Not Just E-Mailing Anymore
        Cynthia Murnan (Oberlin College)

Customer Support

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 7


Students are walking around with cell phones, making calls and text-messaging. For many, this has now become their main communication mechanism with friends and family. College faculty and staff still count on e-mail as the main communication tool, amongst themselves and with students. Demand for e-mail accounts from new students before they even arrive on campus has increased exponentially in the past couple of years. Web pages are used to provide information to the outside community and internally, across campus. Web pages have often become the main mechanism for providing step-by-step documentation. Meanwhile, wikis, blogs and MySpace.com have entered the online communication world. Students look at our web pages, but how often? They all have college-provided e-mail accounts, but do they use them? What is the best mechanism these days to get the word out, and what will be the mechanism in the future? This paper will explore the mechanisms and approaches that students, and others on campus, are using to communicate now, and will present thoughts on where we’re going in the future and the impact that will have on user services.

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Podcasting Made Simple
        Terris Wolff (Univ of So Calif School of Social Work)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 12


The University of Southern California started a Technology Enhanced Learning initiative in the 2005-06 academic year. In response, two faculty teaching two different courses in the School of Social Work experimented with podcasting as a way of supplementing classroom lectures. In the Spring 2006 semester they used digital recorders to capture their lectures. The recording device - which connected to a computer via a built-in USB connector - produced ".WMA" files. The files were edited and converted to ".MP3" files, and then posted in two places - into the respective courses' Blackboard section and on a school web server. Students used the podcasts and other materials for review. This paper will outline the experiences of the faculty and what the School's IT organization did to support the experiment. The presentation will include a live demonstration, including posting to a server if a network connection is available.

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Putting Out the Fire Before It Starts: Proactive Technology Support
        Keelan Cleary , Melissa Rycroft (Bucknell University)

Customer Support

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 10



At Bucknell University, the Technology Support workgroup has initiated a proactive approach to faculty and staff desktop computing support. Through the use of scanning and monitoring tools, we seek to identify and eliminate potential problems before the client can be disrupted or inconvenienced.

We currently have several tools that allow us to distribute timely information to the client. These tools include the opening greeting heard by callers of our technology support number, a web based campus outage and alert center, a custom outage-alert/popup program on the client’s computer, portal access to our problem tracking system, and numerous training sessions.

Technology Support has also bought and developed several tools to gather information from the client’s computers in order to identify machines that will soon be having trouble. These tools help us remotely identify failing hard drives, identify disks approaching capacity, and identify and sometimes fix other preventable problems.

Our Technology Support workgroup currently manages an array of centrally managed, preventative maintenance services for our clients, including anti-virus, anti-spyware, windows patching (via WSUS) and centralized, network backup of all faculty and staff desktops.

Thanks to our use of proactive tools, we have been able to reduce the number of emergency calls and lower the downtime experienced by our clients. Proactive computing support is better for Technology Support staff and for the university than the reactive/crisis model.


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Lessons Learned From the Library: Building Partnerships Between Campus and Departmental IT Support
        Martin Wolske , Beth Larkee, Kathryn Lyons, Kelly Bridgewater (University of Illinois)

Management

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 5



How to do more with less has become a recurring theme in discussions amongst IT professionals, but this has been a theme amongst library professionals for many years. Libraries have worked to build consortiums allowing them to minimize duplication of services, thereby maximizing their utilization of resources while assuring a high quality of service for patrons. A review was therefore undertaken of the University of Illinois Library system to consider how the lessons they have learned regarding resource sharing amongst campus and departmental libraries could be applied to University of Illinois IT support groups. This presentation will provide an overview of the findings from this study. In addition, specific examples of how the University of Illinois campus-wide IT support group, CITES, and departmental IT support groups are working together to optimize centralized and distributed services as a means for increasing the overall service levels provided to users while minimizing overall support costs will be detailed.


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Because We Have Better Things to Do: Automating Common Support Tasks
        Stephen G. Lewis , Keith B. Erekson (Lehigh University)

Technology

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 14



As technology permeates more aspects of our everyday lives, greater demands are placed on information technology personnel. Lehigh University computing consultants have found their scope of responsibility becoming broader as campus departments turn to computer-based workflow solutions. In previous years, consultants were tasked with setup, training, and support for PCs and their associated applications. More recently, however, consultants have been asked to lend their expertise to the evaluation, design, testing, and implementation of campus technology projects and enhancements, while continuing to meet the needs of their clients.

Struggling to deal with increased demand on their time, Lehigh’s computing consultants have developed a variety of time-saving methods, scripts, and utilities. They fall into two general categories: self-service tools for end-users and internal staff utilities. Self-service examples include tools that configure e-mail, install networked printers, and map drives for off-campus users. Examples of staff utilities include hardware-independent disk imaging, simplified software distribution, and streamlined remote assistance procedures.

Freeing staff from common support tasks allows them to focus on other demanding projects. Lehigh University is excited to share their time-saving developments with other institutions in hopes that they will be able to realize the level of efficiently to which Lehigh has grown accustomed.

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We Got The Message: Creating an Instant Messenger Service Point
        Jason Snyder , Meredith Field (Bucknell University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD


Figuring out the best way to communicate with and serve students is one of the paramount challenges facing library and technology organizations today - including Bucknell University’s merged Information Services and Resources organization (ISR). In an effort to resolve this issue we went straight to our students. We asked our student advisory group, “Why are students not using traditional service models (walk-up desks and email), and how should we communicate with students in order to better meet their service needs?”

The response was unanimous: students prefer to communicate via instant messenger (IM). They suggested that we establish a screen name to handle technology and library questions.

ISR formed a committee to plan a pilot IM service, and less than a year later introduced “ISRBuddy”. This central triage screen name is another entryway to our broad organization that helps students navigate our services. The service expectation was that ISRBuddy would answer simple questions (often using our online knowledgebase) and direct complex questions to specific service desks. Logistical considerations such as software, scheduling, staffing, and assessment were planned well in advance of the pilot launch, which occurred in Spring 2006 after much marketing.

Our pilot semester of ISRBuddy taught us many things about our students, including what type of information they need, what their work patterns are, and the level of service they expect from an online help point. After the successful pilot, we made several tweaks to the service and look forward to using this new service point in Fall 2006.



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The Easy Way to Move Windows Profiles and Data
        Todd Fogle , Keelan Cleary (Bucknell University)

Technology

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 12

The idea of replacing faculty and staff computers can be daunting to say the least and data transfer has always been an inefficient monster. This year Bucknell University has integrated the latest version of Microsoft’s free User State Migration Tool into our desktop replacement process, allowing us to migrate multiple users and their data from one machine to another without any need for the client’s presence.

The User State Migration Tool has allowed us to drastically reduce the amount of time and user interaction required to replace faculty and staff computers.

In order to successfully use this tool in our workflow, we needed to perform several important customizations:

1. Create custom INF files so the tool will only migrate the data we wanted to keep
2. Create GUI front ends to either remotely back up a client’s profile to a network drive or remotely back up a profile to a new machine and automatically load the profile on the new machine
3. Create a webpage that allows us to view the status of all the profile transfers that are currently in progress.

By customizing and automating the User State Migration Tool, we have been able to streamline our desktop replacement process and reduce the time spent and manpower needed to re-image existing computers and setup newly deployed computers.


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Purdue's System-Wide Deployment of a Classroom Response System
        Steven Lichti (Purdue University)

Instruct Support & Class Tech

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 12

Purdue University's system-wide deployment of a classroom response system has grown to include use by over forty courses and one-third of all students. It has quickly become a staple, much like computers and projectors. It is used most heavily by faculty teaching large-lecture survey courses to conduct real-time quizzing, take attendance, and record extra credit. Information is later uploaded to WebCT Vista.

Many faculty members have expressed their appreciation at having a single, standardized, and supported classroom response system. Many students have communicated that using a response pad in class enables them to participate to a greater degree, making it possible to concentrate on specific topics.

Since piloting this technology and then implementing it campus-wide, we have worked extensively with eInstruction to develop an integration tool within WebCT Vista that allows secure, quick, and easy response pad registration, as well as aiding in the testing of new technology. We are currently awaiting our first batch of next generation receivers to upgrade our response system. Students using the response system for the first time in Fall 2007 will have new RF response pads containing LCDs and more advanced bidirectional communication.

As with many other instructional technologies, implementing and managing a campus-wide classroom response system has been both a challenging and rewarding experience. Purdue's model has worked well, and growth has been dramatic.

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Compared to Operation Overlord, deploying and supporting laptop should be easy.
        Joseph Hughes (Rollins College)

Customer Support

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 10


In 1997, Rollins College started to award undergraduate students with scholarships that included a laptop computer. In the program's infancy, support was supplied by a single student assistant. Eventually a dedicated full time staff member was hired and the office moved from a storage closet to the IT Repair Shop. After two more moves and the addition of two full time staff members, the laptop repair shop responsibility grew to the current 1700 machines.
The supported population now contains three distinct demographics: undergraduate students, graduate students and employees of Rollins College. Each group has their own distinct characteristics that must be addressed, from the logistics of initial deployment to ongoing support depending on their style of usage. For the undergraduates, the students receive their laptops during orientation and typically use their laptops more for personal use than academic needs. This presents the challenge of preparing and then deploying 250 units in one day. In contrast, the graduate students attend orientations in smaller groups (approximately 30) that last 3 hours. This group is more demanding on their laptops due to daily academic use and therefore has a higher proportion of technical issues.
Finally, Rollins College IT technicians individually assist employees in the migrating from old to new hardware, familiarizing the user with their new machine. Integrating all the different user styles with a multitude of software and hardware issues, and yet resolving these problems with in a 24-48 hour period is an increasing challenge to the IT staff of Rollins College.


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Bridging the Student Support Gap
        Jey Bailey , Jamie Piperberg (Bucknell University)

Customer Support

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 7


In recent years, the use of a computer has become a requirement for success in a collegiate environment, and the demand for mobile computing has sharply increased. In response to these trends, Bucknell University has taken a proactive role in supporting the computing and technology needs of its students, faculty and staff.

To meet these needs, Bucknell University created a student support model for personally owned computers. This model currently consists of our Techdesk, Techdesk Advanced Support Team, the Bison Laptop Program, and the Student Laptop Loaner Program. These areas will continue to evolve to meet the needs of the Bucknell University community.

The various parts of the support model each have a valuable contribution to the overall level of service and support that we are able to offer to the Bucknell University community. Our Techdesk and Techdesk Advanced Support Team answer general questions and resolve hardware and software issues. The Bison Laptop Program helps reduce the variety of hardware and software that we encounter, which reduces support requirements. The Student Laptop Loaner Program provides assistance during long-term repairs for students outside our laptop program. Together, these components allow us to provide a premier level of support.

We plan to share our experiences and explain how the portions of our support model allow us to support the Bucknell University community. We believe that this could greatly benefit other institutions seeking to create or refine their student support model.

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A Recharge Model for End User Computing Support: Yes! People Pay Us to Fix their Computers
        Michelle Bautista , Bryan Lee (UC Berkeley)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 10


UC Berkeley's Departmental Onsite Computing Support is a subscription based model for dedicated annual tech support service: Mac/Windows, Desktops and Servers, PDAs and other peripherals. We analyze clients’ computing needs, help design and implement infrastructure, handle immediate needs (fires) while performing ongoing maintenance and upgrades to prevent fires.

Many central campus services provide limited phone, email and to some extent drop-in help desk on specific services (email, calendar, etc). However, many problems need to be handled at the user’s machine in the user’s environment.

Several colleges within UC Berkeley and some majors/departments have their own help desk service or desktop support model, but the vast majority of administrative and academic departments are on their own. Some hire in-house technicians or student workers for their IT needs. Smaller units usually go without any direct support.

The DOCS recharge model can be used as a 2nd tier to the Help Desk for in-depth work. The model is flexible enough to adjust staffing based on interest or stretched to provide different layers and levels of service and pricing. From a department too small to hire their own IT staff, to a large department in need of multiple platform support.

This paper and presentation looks to explore how and where to expand our current services. It will demonstrate the current effectiveness of our current level of service. It will also address campus wide needs for campus level services that don’t offer any in-person or on-site support as well as other areas of improvement or expansion.

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Assessing and Conquering Burnout
        Jerry K. Smith , Almond D. Dillard (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Management

Tuesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 5





Our paper examines the widely known Phenomenon called burnout. It is known that burnout is prevalent amongst those who work in customer service, especially those that have direct contact with their customers. The computer lab operations at large universities are prime candidates for this phenomenon. Stressors controlled and uncontrolled are often the culprits attacking customer service personnel causing them to experience burnout. Leadership styles, promotional opportunities, time off, are all potentially key elements in effecting burnout. There are three main elements of burnout measurement: Emotional exhaustion measures feelings of being emotionally overextended and exhausted by one's work. Depersonalization measures an unfeeling and impersonal response toward recipients of one's service, care treatment, or instruction Personal accomplishment measures feelings of competence and successful achievement in one's work.

Burnout results in lost productivity, turnover in personnel, and other negatives. In student computing laboratories, direct contact with student customers and constant changes in technology also contribute to burnout. When burnout is recognized, it is too late to make the changes to prevent it, but it is never too late to eliminate it. At UTSA early assessment, identification, and implementation of policies and changes in environment reduced the potentiality of burnout. Organizational communication and the knowledge of burnouts causes and effects are invaluable tools that your college or university can use in its prevention. Once you have assessed and identified potential burnout you must then implement those changes to reduce stressors and maintain open communications with personnel to identify and meet their needs.


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How’d they do that? Modified Instructional System
        George Bradford (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Training and Documentation

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 14


This paper explains how we modified our instructional system to improve technical training quality and how we trimmed down-training time. It explains how we accomplished these undertakings with a relatively small staff and a limited budget. At the outset, our vision was to put in place a viable on-site technical training program and one that our faculty and staff would voluntarily choose to attend for their initial or refresher training. Our goal was to produce a sustainable, good and highly interactive technical training program. We knew that to accomplish all that we wanted, we would have to use our own design and development capabilities to modify vendor supplied course materials. Unfortunately, most technical training courseware available through commercial agencies usually requires six to eight hours to instruct and is focused primarily on business training scenarios rather than universities like ours. This complicated our problem even more, because we would need to, at least consider, modifying all courses vendor courses.

Despite the abovementioned challenges, we are realizing our vision and we met our goal. Our learners voluntarily attend our training and their feedback is replete with favorable comments about their learning experience. Our small staff perceived these challenges as an opportunity for to succeed and succeed we did. We'll tell you the story of how we did it as we go along.



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Rollins College Laptop Repair Services
        Christopher Howe (Rollins College)

Customer Support

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 10


With the increase of students participating in the Rollins College Laptop Program, Rollins needed to improve our ability to manage, care for, and repair student’s laptops in a holistic manner. As a department it was decided that service needed to be at the forefront of our laptop program in order to ensure students had their laptops returned in the shortest amount of time possible. After assessing the current situation a plan was set in motion to decrease downtime and increase support levels. This was done through our purchasing program and the support laptop manufacturers provide. Along with manufacturer’s support we looked at the operating procedures and ideas currently in place and made many changes to them in order to simplify and organize the repair shop. This included creating a set of standard procedures and enforcing them within the repair shop. Over the course of 5 years we have reduced repair times from 2-3 weeks down to 1-3 days. The program is ongoing but has been a great success for Rollins College. Instituting some of the changes discussed could have an impact on any organization that is attempting to streamline and improve there laptop support division.



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Me and My Shadow
        Kathy Lyons , Martin Wolske (University of Illinois)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 7



Building relationships with internal and external technical support staff can be an important factor in developing an effective and successful Help Desk. Strong relationships improve the efficiency of information flow, thereby improving the quality of support provided to customers. The Campus Information Technologies and Educational Services (CITES) Help Desk at the University of Illinois started a job-shadowing program to strengthen relationships within CITES. The program pairs a Help Desk consultant with a service manager or other CITES support professionals, allowing each participant to see the daily hands on activities of the person they are shadowing. Consultants better understand the processes behind services provided by CITES, while service managers better understand the daily activities of Help Desk consultants. Based on these successes, CITES and departmental support groups such as the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS) have joined together to extend the job shadowing program. This has provided valuable information regarding the strengths that each support group can bring together in addressing the technical opportunities and challenges of faculty, staff and students. In this session we talk about the importance of building relationships and how to setup a successful job-shadowing program.


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No One Needs It (Until They Need It) - Implementing a New Desktop Backup Solution
        Melissa E. Rycroft (Bucknell University)

Technology

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 9



Faced with upgrading a set of Veritas Netbackup servers backing up 1000 Windows desktop computers and a Retrospect server backing up 200 Macintosh desktop computers, Bucknell University embarked on a project to identify and implement a new desktop backup solution. Working together, Technology Support and Systems Integration selected, configured, and installed CommVault Galaxy as a backup solution for all desktop Macintosh and Windows computers. Added pressures during the process included the incompatibility of the old servers with newer operating systems and increasing failures in aging backup software. In an attempt to maintain the optimum levels of available data, we developed a strategy and schedule to transition 1200 computers to the new backup as soon as disk space became available.This paper will examine the criteria used to select a new desktop backup solution and the implementation strategies employed to insure comprehensive data protection during the transition. Content will include selection of an administrative mechanism for the new server and service, examination of data protection and retention policies, documentation, customization to address end-user concerns about reporting and notification, and techniques used to install and uninstall the software from client workstations.


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Software Management
        Cindy Dooling , Jeff White, Cathy Lee (Pima Community College)

Customer Support

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 10



Software management problems? This session will discuss and demonstrate how Pima Community College (PCC) reigned in control of the software on 5,550 desktop and portable computers located over six campuses, two district offices, and nine center locations.

To combat the lack of software standards and perceived legality issues, PCC developed a software plan with input faculty, staff, and administrators. Prior to implementation of this plan, all users could purchase, download, or share software at will. During this session you will learn how PCC developed the plan and overcame many obstacles including; support issues, auditing and verification, compatibility, user adoption, license agreements, and plan enforcement. In addition, you will learn about IT staff certification and training.

Since implementation PCC has realized many benefits including; bulk or volume purchasing, up to date software, college-wide site license agreements, improved standards, reduced helpdesk support, consistency between locations, higher user awareness, and increased IT staff credibility.

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Research data storage available to researchers throughout the US via the TeraGrid
        Matt Link , Scott McCaulay (Indiana University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



Many faculty members at small to mid-size colleges and universities do important, high quality research that requires significant storage. In many cases such storage requirements are difficult to meet with local resources, and even when local resources suffice data integrity is best ensured by maintenance of a remote copy. Indiana University is, via the nationally-funded TeraGrid, offering researchers at colleges and universities throughout the US the opportunity to easily store up to 1 TB of data within the IU data storage system.

The TeraGrid is the National Science Foundation's flagship effort to create a national research cyberinfrastructure, and one key goal of the TeraGrid is to provide facilities that improve the research productivity of the US research community generally. Providing facilities that improve the capacity and reliability of research data storage is an important part of this. This paper will describe the process for storing data, via the TeraGrid, at IU, and will in general discuss how this capability is part of a larger TeraGrid-wide data storage strategies.

After reading the poster paper, readers will have all of the knowledge required to obtain a TeraGrid account and store and retrieve data from IU's massive data storage system.


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Hiring, Training and Retaining: Managing Student Employee Turnover
        Sian Shumway and Chris Washington , Vivian Chang and Jon Crumpler (UC Berkeley)

Management

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 5



Coming from a large university with a student staff of approximating 80, our hiring became overwhelming for one or two supervisors who had to hire 30-40 new consultants. We had to get the best results without sacrificing so much of our time. This paper will present a streamlined system that makes hiring and training a more efficient process. Our training begins when they are hired and continues throughout the course of their job to ensure quality student consultants.

1. Hiring - From recruiting to interviewing: The most time demanding sections of the hiring process have been streamlined by web interfaces. We involve our student supervisors to give them experience and get them involved, as well as reclaim some of our own time.

2. Orientation training - Hands on and a one-day overview session: In the past we attempted to train new consultants over one weekend, bombarding them with information. We found this method ineffective because of the lack or retention and interaction. Though more time consuming initially, our solution was to move to one brief introductory session and multiple one-on-one “shadow shifts” that emphasized consultant interaction and reinforcement of materials; this yielded better consultants!

3. Ongoing training - Competency exams and on the job technical training: In order to accommodate high turnover and varied skill sets, we have structured our consultant training to be both flexible and specific to individual needs.

4. How are they doing - Evaluations: We meet with newly hired employees to access their progress and address problems early.

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Computer Lab Reservations: Improving How to Manage Multiple Reservation Life Cycles
        Nicole Sattler (University of California, Berkeley)

Customer Support

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 10

Since 2003, computer lab reservations during the summer semester have been growing more quickly than resources for managing computer lab reservations at the University of California, Berkeley. In the past one could easily manage the varying life cycles of lab reservations between May and August using notes and a paper calendar: the request, the lab’s response to technical needs such as creating computer accounts, installing software and setting up printing capabilities, verification of fees paid if applicable, account testing by the user to catch any problems with the account, and finally, staffing the lab and holding the reservation on the appointed day. This cycle repeats for every new account reservation at the Workstation and Microcomputer Facilities (W&MF) on the Berkeley campus.

Though new ways are sought to change the W&MF reservation system, the process must continue to include Oracle Calendar since each lab is a shared resource in the department. To date, calendaring for computer lab reservations has been maintained partially using this software with all other setup functions handled manually using written notes and email. This search for new software tools focused on systems that would not only improve documentation and milestone monitoring, but also increase the efficiency of communication among the facility coordinators concerning account status. Experiments were conducted with Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project, and PHP Wiki from August 2005 through June 2006 with varying levels of success.

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The Matrix and Beyond: Expanding Proactive Resources for Customers
        Mo Nishiyama , Leslie McNeil, Holly Wyatt (Oregon Health & Science University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



Essential duties of Oregon Health & Science University’s Information Technology Group involve providing support for a diverse customer base. Faculty, staff, students, volunteers, visiting scholars, interns, vendors, and community healthcare partners all rely on ITG’s Customer Relations Management Division (CRMD) for resolving their computing and account access issues. In a dynamic support environment where many of the customer base fall outside the one-size-fits-all support approach, CRMD expanded their approach to accommodate their diverse clients.

CRMD’s Computer Access Administration introduced role-based matrices on their electronic account request forms to help simplify the challenges of granting appropriate network accesses. The revamped forms reduced follow-up contacts from customers. CRMD’s HelpDesk launched an online self-service portal for providing customers with one-stop shopping for their diverse computing needs. Contents provided on the portal include self-service password changes, tree-based knowledge base articles organized by applications, quick reference guides for role-based password requirements and core applications, password and access matrix for nearly 40 applications, and computing tips of the week. The portal provides a convenient around-the-clock alternative for customers who wish to resolve their computing issues immediately without having to contact the HelpDesk directly.

By implementing proactive forms and resources, CRMD has taken steps to address the ever-expanding needs of their diverse customer base. These changes increase the level of self-sufficiency for customers, reduce the staff’s phone contact time for routine issues, and provide the CRMD a chance to learn the needs of their constituents.


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Notebook Universities do not have to be Expensive
        Jon Rickman , Kim Todd; Tabatha Verbick; Merlin Miller (Northwest Missouri State University)

Customer Support

Wednesday, 8:30am - 10:00am, Room: 7



Most notebook universities have a process to provide notebook computers for a large portion of its students. The universities charge each student a notebook fee which is typically around $1,000 per year. Usually, each university owns or leases the computers and tries to replace them every two years. Northwest Missouri State University has implemented a system to provide notebooks to every student living on-campus by increasing residence hall and tuition technology fees for a total cost of about $300 per year. Students living off-campus also have the option to rent a notebook computer at a similar cost.

Northwest’s model for providing notebooks to students has several key features. First, the notebooks are purchased by the university and the expected life cycle is three years. Second, the notebooks are purchased with a three year warranty and students are responsible for providing damage and theft insurance. Third, the university owns the computers and utilizes volume independent licenses for most software. Finally with 2,500 student notebooks to support, Northwest has only 2.5 FTE staff positions for maintenance and repair of these units.

With Northwest’s computing model, higher expectations can be set for freshman academic assignments, since they are required to live on-campus and faculty can depend on students having access to standardized computing resources. Experience has shown that upper-classmen try to stay compatible with the computing model they have used for one or more years.

This paper will discuss the challenges and benefits of implementing a low-cost, university-owned notebook computing model.


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Cultivating an Awesome IT staff
        Mark R. Ritschard (Colorado State University)

Management

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 5

A good IT staff is hard to keep—or are they? Hiring the right people must be a priority; keeping them on board is just as important. Setting priorities in hiring and screening all applicants is essential to maintaining a dedicated staff. Once a good staff is on board, it's the small things that count, although a bit of funding for professional development is always nice.
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Thin Clients: the Key to Our Success
        Mark R. Ritschard (Colorado State University)

Technology

Monday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: 9



Have you noticed that every major vendor has a thin client solution? What does this mean for technology support experts and are we ready for the consequences? The College of Engineering at Colorado State University has implemented a very successful thin client solution. Thin clients have their down sides (they will be covered) and challenges (also covered), but we sure love the benefits (emphasized herein).


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Using coLinux to Provide Linux Environment on Windows PC in Public Computer Labs
        Hideo Masuda , Michio Nakanishi, Akinori Saitoh, Seigo Yasutome (Kyoto Institute of Technology, JAPAN)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD



There are many requirements from teachers to computer lab management staff in universities. The most annoying one is that both Windows and Linux environment are required. Usually, a dual-boot system is widely used to satisfy this request. This system has, however, had several problems. For example, we have to repeat the boot and shutdown process to apply patches to both Windows and Linux.
We have decided to use coLinux to run Linux as a Windows application, and implemented this in our PC classroom. The coLinux is an open-source, lightweight solution as compared to full virtualization techniques such as VMware or Virtual PC. The cygwin could be another solution, but it has some restrictions against the full capability of Linux like process management. Users can use Linux applications and Windows applications simultaneously on their screen. Our solution also avoids incompatibility problems that sometimes occur between Microsoft Office on Windows and Office suites on Linux. We will present our design and technical know-how in the conference.




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Against All Odds: A Successful Exchange Migration
        Theresa Duhart , Heidi Wasem (University of Puget Sound)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 10

Ten years ago, e-mail was a new technology spreading like wildfire in universities and colleges across the country. Today, it is our official mode of communication and stores vital records for our organization.
As our campus grew and departments became decentralized, the need for enterprise calendaring became necessary to collaborate. CorporateTime became the standard for scheduling meetings on campus.
Without e-mail and calendar, how would an organization function?
The University of Puget Sound recently converted our sendmail and CorporateTime calendar services to Microsoft Exchange 2003. This paper will address the key user support aspects of this major shift in campus technology.
We will outline our entire Exchange migration process, from the selection of the server product, to the desktop client upgrade hurdles through our communication, support and training planning progression.
As with any major project, there were obstacles to overcome and political support needed to ensure success. In addition to our entire user support and network teams, we utilized the outside services of Seitel Leeds and Associates, SimplerWebb, New Horizons, and Robert Half to provide technology consulting, calendar data conversion, training, and desktop client configuration.
This project was a huge step forward for our department in the areas of planning and communication with our constituents.

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"Training the Campus" - A Look at Acadia University Computer Support Training
        Gregory (Greg) Deveau , NA (Acadia University)

Poster

Tuesday, 1:30pm - 3:00pm, Room: CD

This presentation will cover the fundamentals of setting up your support staff to offer certified Microsoft training to your campus. Microsoft Office Specialist certification is the globally recognized standard for skills with the Microsoft Office suite. The MOS program is the ONLY Microsoft approved certification program designed to measure and validate users' skills.
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Enhancing Training and Documentation by Eliminating Artificial Boundaries
        Rita K. Pavolka (Indiana University)

Training and Documentation

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 14

Support organizations now find that the boundaries between training and documentation as well as technology and pedagogical support are ever expanding, overlapping, and artificial. When a new document is created, is it going to be used in support of training, or will your customers use it as documentation. Does it really matter? As new technologies appear it becomes necessary to provide more and more support that is "just in time". When a training unit needs to develop workshops on quickly changing open source software, how can they best take advantage of the work being done by the folks who are creating documentation? If online documentation is being written, will they be able to find out what the training unit has already developed? If graphics are captured by one unit can they be easily reused? How do you effectively coordinate the schedules of multiple teams? Combining the forces of teams whose focus may not be exactly the same has become a necessity. Reinventing the wheel is not just unnecessary but unsupportable. How do the various units across our support organizations work effectively together, creating an integrated support structure for the faculty, staff and students of our universities and colleges? Join us for a panel discussion by representatives of Indiana University and University of Michigan as we discuss the challenges and rewards of integrating the support mechanisms we have developed in support of the new infrastructure and tools of the open source Sakai community.



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Working Collaboratively in the Big Ten and Beyond
        Lynnell J. Lacy (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Laurie Sutch (University of Michigan)

Management

Monday, 10:30am - Noon, Room: 5

With each passing year, campus IT professionals continue to be called upon to do more with less. The burning question at some point becomes, "Okay, but HOW?" The answer - one which many SIGUCCS "old timers" readily share - will be revealed in this session which offers proven success stories that demonstrate how well we work when we work well together. Come on in and collaborate!

This session's presenters are members of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), a consortium of 12 research universities, including the 11 members of the Big Ten Conference and the University of Chicago. With campuses in 8 states, CIC universities enroll more than 300,000 undergraduates and 76,000 graduate students, and employ some 33,000 full-time faculty and 139,000 full-time staff. The CIC is guided by the Provosts of the member universities. Together, various sub-groups build and maintain relationships with a focus on three areas of dynamic, evolving collaboration: (1) national leadership for higher education; (2) combining, leveraging and expanding resources of member universities; and (3) expanding learning opportunities by sharing unique courses and programs.

The members of the IT Training Group are appointed by the CIC Chief Information Officers and are comprised of training professionals responsible for the design, development and delivery of technical training event-driven courses or workshops, as well as programs that target various campus communities. The group collaborates to share best practices, engage in collaborative problem-solving and investigate possibilities for cooperative future work.


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What Trainers Can Learn From Consulting
        Alan Bilansky (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign)

Training and Documentation

Monday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 14

With the exception of occasional follow-up phone calls or emails after a seminar, most trainers do not do much consulting. However, this presentation comes out of experience on a team that provides both training and instructional design consulting to faculty (dealing with WebCT and other technologies such as Web publishing, Microsoft Office, etc), and also works closely with our campus's main IT help desk.

I will discuss the many ways that training has benefited from our consulting and basic support experience. We see in detail how our audience works with and talks about technology, what hardware and software they have in their offices, and exactly what uses they see for the technology. Perhaps most importantly, consulting contacts act as a qualitative evaluation of our training programs. Also, support experience helps us in fine-tuning the content on our Web site. We have accumulated experience in doing two things at once: addressing basic computing issues at the same time that we deal with design and pedagogical issues.

How can trainers be more programmatic about making intelligent use of consulting and support experience? If consulting isn't part of their job, how can trainers make more use of the experience of consultants and the help desk? Join me for the beginning of an on-going discussion where we can all share experiences and best practices at their respective institutions both at the Conference and post-Conference via a wiki.


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Training and Support from A to Z: Meeting the Many Needs of Graduate Students
        Laurie Sutch , Darlene Nichols, Nancy Sims (University of Michigan University Library)

Training and Documentation

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 14

The Graduate Library at the University of Michigan provides a suite of innovative support services that are tailored to meet the unique learning, research, and teaching needs of graduate students. By tailoring services to the graduate student population, and encouraging them to take advantage other services open to all on campus, the Library is able to meet their needs while simultaneously treating them as members of the larger academic community.

Graduate students must quickly develop a number of new skills when they begin working at a higher academic level. The Library’s “Digital Dissertation” workshop series offers sessions on a wide range of research and technology topics. Offerings in recent semesters have included: “Making Posters with Illustrator and PowerPoint”, “Academic Research with Google”, “Conducting the Literature Review in the Social Sciences” and the highly popular “Using Word Effectively for Your Dissertation”. In addition, the centrally located Knowledge Navigation Center, a training-oriented computer lab, provides drop-in assistance on a wide variety of computer software.

The Graduate Library also helps graduate students in their roles as instructors. Library instructors have worked with other campus groups to provide training and orientation for new Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs). Often, librarians help GSIs create assignments or teach information-literacy or technology-instruction sessions to their classes.

This paper will review the current suite of training and support opportunities at the Graduate Library and explain the history of and motivations behind the various programs. It will also discuss tips and ideas for implementing a similar program.

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Just Fix It: IT Support for Students
        Kevin J. Bailey (Yale Law School)

Customer Support

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 7

This paper describes the programs and services Yale Law School has in place to provide IT Support to students. This includes public and restricted-access computer clusters and a walk-in student help desk. The focus is on describing how Yale Law School provides a high level of service and support for Student IT needs utilizing a combination of in-house staff, student workers, and Central Campus Resources.

Some suggestions are for maximizing time and resources:
1) Leverage existing network technologies such as Symantec Ghost,
Active Directory and VB scripting for management of computing clusters.

YLS has 68 computers in its computer clusters that are in the University Active Directory Domain. We use Group Policies to manage: updates for existing software, new software rollouts, security settings and customization of the user experience.

2) Partner with other university IT departments to find creative
ways to repurpose technologies they have produced.

YLS partners Yale ITS to provide such services as centralized printing and Student Information Services.

3) Organize and train work-study students for staffing and handling
the day-to-day management of a help desk for students.

Planning and documenting processes and procedures for our student workers has resulted in an unprecedented rise in productivity and quality of service.

4) Utilizing a combination of training, documentation and orientation sessions, provide a framework that anticipates the needs of the community and seeks to reduce the costs and time required to meet them.

YLS IT now produces a large amount of documentation updated yearly and as needed in order to provide speedy, efficient answers to student questions.

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Network Based Storage - Getting Students To Actually Use It
        Allan Chen (Stanford University)

Technology

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 12

This presentation will look at the history of network storage options at Stanford University, the various obstacles which have appeared and been overcome, and analyze the route through which we have achieved widespread adoption both in and outside of our labs. We will focus on the experiences, rather than the technology, as an example (or
comparison) for other schools.

Implementing a network storage solution for students has been an ongoing effort within the Academic Computing department at Stanford University.
Students need to be able to access their files in our labs, in their rooms, and even off campus. While removable media in the form of floppy then Zip discs and now USB "thumbdrives" have filled this need to an extent, it is still critical to offer a reliable network storage solution.

Central ITS has offered an AFS-based solution for a number of years, but achieving wide-spread use through reliable means has been difficult.
They have offered and/or built tools ranging from simple FTP to modified versions of OpenAFS to students to access their home folders. However, it was not until very recently that use of this service has increased.
Most importantly, it seems that the biggest factor was not simply that the methods for access matured, but that we have migrated our desktop experience to make such access seamless and invisible.

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Now That We Are All So Well-Educated About Spyware, Can We Put The Bad Guys Out Of Business?
        Karen McDowell (University of Virginia)

Technology

Tuesday, 3:30pm - 5:00pm, Room: 9

The phenomenon known variously as "spyware," "adware, and/or "malware" has grown exponentially in the past few years and has been swamping our computer systems, much like email spam but significantly worse in every sense of the word.

Complicating the matter, the line between viruses and spyware is rapidly blurring, largely because of the increasing sophistication of this spyware and the multiplication of "bots." While it is possible that university students are even more susceptible than the general public, it is certainly true that this is a serious national problem.

Learning to identify and remove these insidious files is a critical step in securing computers and networks and in enabling faculty, staff, and students to complete their work safely and efficiently.


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